Having a scan with your head in a rubber hat

NHS

Dr Jim Stevenson, reflects on life as a radiologist in the 1970s.

 

Jim StevensonI started my radiological life in the mid seventies at St George’s Hospital. Part of the rotation programme involved some time at the Atkinson Morley Hospital where I came across the first generation scanner. There was an old dental chair on which a patient laid back with his head in a rubber hat in the scanner porthole. It took 8 slices. Each slice took 5 minutes using an old fashioned tomogram X-ray tube. The image details were processed by a very large computer. The resultant image was printed on a photograph. The image matrix was 80 by 80, an advance since the original 40 by 40. How Jamie Ambrose invented the reports I do not know but his detailed knowledge of brain anatomy was quite outstanding.

Once when walking past the scanner I saw a porter in a brown overall walking round the machine. Being concerned about security, I spoke to Jamie Ambrose. “Don’t worry about him,” he said, ‘”That’s only Godfrey“ (Hounsfield from EMI).

Significant advances in CT occurred about every 5 years. When the first body images appeared we all had to learn cross-sectional anatomy. Since 1945 all anatomy was taught in longitudinal section – sagittal and coronal. I showed an image to my father-in-law. He had no problem with it but he had qualified in 1940. Before the war, all medics had to learn cross-section anatomy! The very best cross-section anatomy book I found was Eycleshymer and Schoemaker published in America in 1911. Still much better than the modern ones of recent times. The only difficulty is that all the labels are in Latin which can make interpretation difficult!

Over the past fifty years medical technology advances have been and will continue to be outstanding. The need to make proper use of them hasn’t changed. Wet films, fluorescent imaging, U/S, MRI and digital are all contributing to our future.


About Dr Jim Stevenson

Dr James Duncan Stevenson BSc. MB.BS, FRCR trained at St.Thomas’ Hospital Medical School, London and four years later turned to radiology at St.George’s Hospital, London. In November 1980 he became a Consultant Radiologist at Royal Victoria Hospital, Bournemouth and Poole Hospital. He retired in August 2007.

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